🎉 Joie de Vivre – An Exuberant Enjoyment of Life ❤️

🎉 Joie de Vivre – An Exuberant Enjoyment of Life ❤️

Have you noticed that “the truths” of nutrition and health seem to change every day? Coffee’s good for you again. Eggs are in. No, wait, they’re out. Just kidding, we don’t know. And has anyone figured out coconut oil? It’s either magical, or it’s poison.

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Consider trends in lifestyle diets and weight-loss diets as well. High-protein, low-carb diets were quite popular in recent years (Atkins, South Beach, Zone, etc.); then high-fat, moderate protein, and even-lower-carb took the stage (Keto), and then high-carb (some forms of Vegan, Vegetarian) came into the spotlight again. People seem to have attained their best bodies or best lives on all of these types of diets, never to look back. None of these ways of eating are “bad” (though dietitians do generally advise a diet high in veggies and fruits, that provides a good balance of all 3 macronutrients, and you should definitely supplement correctly if you cut out any food groups) – but none of these are the only healthy way to eat, either. Scientists’ “unbiased research” and personal success stories surrounding certain restrictive diets can be so convincing – and so often it makes folks just wanna jump on the bandwagon real quick. I’ve been there.

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However… most dietitians will agree that one-size-fits-all diets shouldn’t be a thing, because we all legitimately have different needs. Nutritional genomics is really up-and-coming, and we’re just now discovering the magnitude of the impact that genetics has on the dietary patterns each body will thrive off of. Every single body functions a little bit differently – we may react differently to the same foods, and digest food at different speeds. We also have different goals, likes and dislikes, schedules, budgets, and lives. We can each find our healthy diet that works for us. It may even evolve and change over time, as our bodies and our lives do. So, it’s hard to pin ourselves to a diet named by one or two words, because there’s so much more to it than that.

We as humans love to have something to belong to and to follow – we were created that way. We also love to feel like we’re doing life right. Eating food that makes us feel good and good about ourselves can be a real positive – but we should certainly never feel that diet is a moral issue or something to take sides on, because according to my God, it’s not. As for Christians, diet should also never become a cause we champion more than Christ’s.

It’s not what goes into your body that defiles you, but what comes out – from your heart. (Mark 7:15)

Don’t worry about what you eat, drink, or wear, says the Lord, for he is your good Father who knows everything you need. (Matthew 6:31)

“I commend the enjoyment of life, because there is nothing better for a person under the sun than to eat and drink and be glad. Then joy will accompany them in their toil all the days of the life God has given them under the sun.” (Ecclesiastes 8:15)

If you’ve ever struggled with feelings of inadequacy affected by what you eat or how you look, you might have trouble believing that these statements are as true for you as they are for others. I’m telling you firsthand that they’re absolutely as true, real, and powerful as every other word of the Lord. He cares less about what you eat, and more about how you act. It matters more how much Jesus you take in daily – how much we worship, look for Him in our daily lives and the Bible, and give our hearts to Him in prayer – than how many grams and what type of protein we ingest. Though nutrition has the power to affect us, spiritual things are infinitely more important.

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Over the past few weeks, I’ve discovered this timeless foundation of dietary advice that has been there for us in God’s word for centuries. Though the world’s thoughts may waver, and though the science of nutrition is always evolving, some things can remain the same. If we can nail these down, we’ll have a filter to use on any new ideas that come at us.

If you’re not into what you’ve read so far, you’re still gonna want to hang with me. I’m serious. These truths are reassuring and helpful, no matter what you believe. They have the power to change the way you view nourishment. I’ve experienced the benefits of this advice to such an extent that I’m sure I’ll never again rely on a restrictive dietary pattern.

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  • 1 Corinthians 10:31 – Whatever you eat, drink, or do – do it all to the Glory of God. Food can easily become an attention-thief if we give it too much importance. My best tips are to enjoy food, enjoy how it enhances fellowship with others, and do your best to eat amounts that fuel you well without holding you back. Let go a bit on worrying about types of foods, and eat with a thankful and positive spirit. Food or the lack of food shouldn’t be an excuse to be grumpy or upset – not at yourself, not at the waitress, not at life.
  • Romans 14:15 – Be considerate of others by not making diet a big issue. In the early church, they worried about whether or not to take food from others because they might not know if it had been offered to idol gods. This is rarely our problem today, however, the guidance Paul gives to those struggling with that issue is still helpful for us. Don’t let something as trivial as food choices negatively affect your relationships, or your witness. Whether this means relaxing your diet a bit on certain occasions and enjoying whatever’s offered at a restaurant or somebody’s home, or, on the flipside, not indulging in a drink if dining with someone who alcohol presents a struggle for, or simply skipping the complaints about feeling fat or full – our friends/family deserve more concern than our food. You never know what others are dealing with – disordered eating, insecurity, depression, addiction – or how your hesitancy toward or overvaluing of food might affect them. By all means, treat yourself well – but consider others, too. Nothing we do is done in a vacuum.
  • Luke 12:16-21 – Don’t spend your life storing up grain (in our terms, this might relate to building up the perfect diet or body). Don’t get me wrong, preparation is good. Bettering ourselves is good. We just need to keep in mind that we never know when our last day will come. We don’t wanna have wasted our life on storing up things that’ll be gone! Focus more on the eternal. 💪🏼
  • Genesis 3:6 – Don’t let the temptation of food or drink keep you from something better. Remember that apple? She couldn’t look past it. When we become fixated on one thing, and that thing’s not God, it can really hurt us.
  • Luke 22:19 – When we eat, remember Him. Jesus refers to bread and wine here, but honestly every meal is an opportunity to remember what he did for us and who he is in our lives. So, let’s eat with gratitude! Remember that God sanctifies all foods that are received with thanksgiving.
  • Philippians 4:12 – We can find contentment in Christ whether full or hungry. 🙌🏼
  • Matthew 4:4 – Man doesn’t live on bread alone, but on every word that God speaks. God nurtures our souls through his word, which contains an invisible sort of provision for us. When Jesus said that we don’t live on bread alone, he was 40 days fasted. Sort of makes it a little more believable, right?
  • In regard to food restrictions on moral terms – Honey, meat, cheese, fish, bread, and wine (in moderation) were all consumed and positively noted in the bible, in too many verses for me list – try Proverbs 24:13, 1 Kings, 17:6, and John 21:13 to start. If Jesus wasn’t too good for ’em… neither am I.

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And my personal favorite verses on this subject:

He reached down from on high and took hold of me; He drew me out of deep waters. Ps. 18:16

He brought me out into a spacious place; He rescued me because He delighted in me. Ps. 18:19

If you have ever worried yourself to death about what you ate – because you couldn’t control it and felt guilty, or because you became obsessed about it and controlled it too much, God can set you free from that. It’s not for us to stress over. When we stress over it, our world gets small – and He wants it to be big! I can personally say that God has drawn me out of deep waters of anxiety and worry concerning many things, including what I eat. He continually brings me out into a spacious place where he reorders priorities in my mind – giving me freedom and the ability to make better choices for myself. He also reaches down from on high on the regular and takes hold of me when I need it. And it just so happens that I need it a lot, so I get a lot of love and “hugs.”

And you can too. All you have to do is ask.

xoxo 😘

Rae

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The Skinny on Fiber

The Skinny on Fiber

If there were a secret ingredient that would help you manage your weight, stay fuller longer, improve your overall health and bodily functioning, and reduce your risk for major diseases – it might just be fiber.

Fiber is probably best known for promoting regular bowel movements (yay), and it has been shown in studies to benefit weight loss, lower cholesterol (Cheerios, anyone?), and reduce the likelihood of developing heart disease, colorectal cancers, and diabetes.

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10.5 grams of fiber right here!

Dietary fiber is also known as “roughage” or “bulk,” and that’s essentially what it is. It’s the portions of plant foods that we aren’t able to digest or absorb, which pass relatively intact through the GI tract. Adequate fiber can improve digestion by helping everything else move along at a steady rate. There are two main classes of fiber – soluble and insoluble (we need both, but it’s helpful to understand the benefits of each).

  • Soluble fiber dissolves in water, forming a gel-like material (Think about the substance that forms when oatmeal, beans, apples, etc. are cooked). This is the type of fiber that can help lower cholesterol and glucose levels, yielding all those wonderful disease prevention benefits. It’s found in most all plant foods, along with insoluble fiber.
  • Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water, and is a big promoter of GI tract motility. It’s found in the tougher, fibrous parts of plant foods – you can picture it if you think about celery strings, potato peels, and oat bran, though it’s found throughout most all plant foods. It could be your new best friend if you struggle with constipation or other GI issues (increase your intake slowly!)

It’s not hard to get enough fiber in your diet. Both soluble and insoluble forms can be found in most plant-based foods. The only foods that don’t contain any fiber are animal products (like eggs, milk, and meat) and oils. Refined grains like white bread don’t have any to speak of either, because the fibrous part of the grain is stripped away when these guys are processed. Some refined grains won’t kill you – but if they’re a mainstay in your diet, you’re probably going to be low on your fiber consumption.

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has set recommendations for fiber intake, based on gender and age. Find yours below:

  • Females – Age 50 and below: 25g/day.   Age 51+: 21g/day
  • Males – Age 50 and below: 38g/day.   Age 51+: 30g/day

These numbers should come naturally if you’re getting enough fruits, vegetables, and whole grains – but for whatever reason, if you’re not getting enough fiber, just a few tweaks can fix that. There are many fiber supplements you can take if you need to, and fiber-enriched products (everything from brownies to yogurt), but it’s simple to get enough fiber from whole foods. Here’s my tips!

 

Breakfast – Oats are my favorite fiber-rich breakfast. Made this bowl with my family. Oats provide 4g fiber per 1 cup of cooked oats, and I had a piece of whole grain toast on the side for 3 more grams. Berries (2g in 1/4 cup), pistachios (1g in just 10 nuts), and a drizzle of almond butter (1.5g in 1 tbsp) amp it up and make it even more delicious! (Total here ~ 8.5 g)

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Other great breakfast options – avacado (6.5g in half an avocado) on whole wheat toast (3g or more per slice); a whole fruit smoothie with chia seeds (5g per tbsp chia); and high-fiber cereal with banana (3.1g per banana). If you go with cereal, look for one low in sugar and with a short list of ingredients.

Lunch – I love almond butter and banana sandwiches on whole wheat. Any nut butter and fruit will do – try peanut, cashew, or sunflower seed butter with thinly sliced apples or bananas. If you wanna make it amazing, pull out a skillet and “grill” your sandwich in a little olive oil!

I also love avocado or hummus as a sandwich spread. Instead of your classic mayo, mustard, etc. on your turkey sammy, try guac! It’s overall better for you, and adds fiber too. If your having trouble with the “wheat bread” concept – some people don’t love it – try Dave’s Killer Bread or Publix fresh baked 100% whole grain. My faves. Make sure your wheat bread’s first ingredient is whole wheat or whole grain flour, not refined! That’s where they trick you.

{Note – gluten intolerant folks – whole wheat obviously isn’t your guy, but you can choose the highest fiber option available and get your fiber from a lot of other sources, too! Pile some veggie slices and hummus on your sandwich, and you’ll be even with the wheat guys.}

If you’re not feeling sandwiches – SALADS are an amazing option. The darker the greens the healthier, but they’ve all got fiber. Toss some beans on there, nuts, more veggies, and maybe a sprinkle of dried fruit. Choose a salad dressing low in saturated fat with a short ingredient list, and you’re good to go.

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All these tips apply for dinner, as well as one more big one – swapping your grains. Instead of white rice or pasta, if you usually have it, try brown rice, quinoa, whole wheat pasta… the list goes on. These guys have more nutrient bang for your buck in general! Pair with sautéed veggies and a pretty piece of fish, and you’ve got… my favorite meal. There are infinite dinner dishes to help you meet your goals – pinterest “vegan/vegetarian meals” or “colorful meals” if you need inspiration! You can always add meat, but these veggie guys have really got the fiber thing figured out.

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Amped-up healthy moes bowl (brown rice, shrimp, olives, sautéed veggies, sprinkle of cheese, dash of sour cream) @ home with the family.
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Fave balanced meal – fish & 3.

Oh yeah, don’t forget about sweet potatoes! My favorite. (~4g/potato!)

Snacks – snacking on raw veggies and hummus, fruits (maybe with a little almond butter) and the like is one of the quickest ways to quench your hunger and also to boost your health (and to make you feel healthier, too!). Fruits and veggies also contain water, which help move the fiber along. More fiber + more water = a happier, healthier you!

Here’s my biggest disclaimer – increase your fiber consumption slowly. If you try to change it too drastically and too quickly, you’ll probably experience some discomfort (bloating, abdominal pain, etc.). Making, say, one change a day (swapping white toast for whole wheat, chips for veggies and hummus, etc.) will assure that your tummy’s microflora have time to adjust to the change in their environment. That’s really what happens! And don’t forget the water to help your body reduce any bloating that might occur. Aim for at least half your weight (lbs.) in water (ounces) a day – or more if you’re pretty physically active. I usually drink at least 100 oz/day, but I’m part camel (kidding). It’s usually best to err on the side of more, but no need to drown yourself.

Fiber helps keep you fuller for longer because it literally fills you up! So, making these swaps should help you to feel more satisfied every day. Studies have actually proven that women lose more weight when consuming more fiber. This should translate to weight maintenance, as well. Less cravings, less hunger pangs? I’m in.

Stay colorful!

Rae