Fear of Failure ūüć≥¬†

Fear of Failure ūüć≥¬†

Our days are already mapped out. Did you know that?

Every single one, written in God’s book.

We get to choose how hard we work at our jobs, what we watch on TV, what we eat, who we spend time with, how often we blog… but He already knows every choice we’ll make before we make¬†it. If we are believers in Christ, His Spirit¬†continually draws us to the places we need to be to make an impact for Him. He knows we’re not perfect, and He will use us and bless us anyway. He actually couldn’t use us if we were perfect… because there’d be no room for Him.¬†People would just see us.

Human perfection is a myth, and this¬†principle bleeds over into every area of our lives. The desire for perfection can actually hinder¬†progress – it’s hard to keep¬†pressing forward when we’re continuously looking back and trying to fix what we messed up, or mentally beating ourselves up over our mistakes. So much can be gained from being accepting, especially of ourselves, and getting back at it.

I can name countless areas where I’ve done both – beat myself up, or kept going – and the latter is always more beneficial. Sports, relationships, eating healthy, school… yeah. Even if you win at everything you attempt, there might still be something you could’ve done better. But that’d keep you from celebrating your victories!

You know what I’m really not perfect at? Among a lot of other¬†things… cooking.

My first cooking experience at my new home in Auburn involved¬†making a huge mess in the microwave (should’ve used a bigger bowl). I¬†know how to make oatmeal… but¬†sometimes new variables enter in. My new microwave is way more powerful than the one in my dorm was.¬†I used a different bowl. The list goes on. However, I could’ve saved myself some¬†cleaning if I had been watching the oats while they cooked. So, that was my takeaway from this – the first time you do something new, keep an eye on it.

empty bowl
My oats were still delicious ūüėČ

My first time using the oven here… I burned my thumb. Don’t try to watch TV while you’re getting¬†a pan out of the oven. But, if you do, life will go¬†on, and the roasted carrots¬†will still be pretty good.

carrot
Roll carrots in olive oil & salt; Bake @ 325 for 30 minutes, flip, and bake 30 more.

I’ve made some really yummy food for myself and my family, and I’ve learned a ton about cooking for one person.¬†Some of my top tips include buying what you¬†like, buying frozen veggies and meat often (because you can’t use fresh as fast as you think), and keeping staples on hand for quick meals. Also, I’ve learned that (though I’m definitely a snack lover) cooking real meals is so much more satisfying, and so much more nourishing to the body,¬†than just eating some stuff out of the cabinet for dinner. Cooking for yourself also gives you a sense of personal pride¬†(Yeah, I made that, and it was darn good!) and is¬†SO much healthier than eating out all the time. Eating out is good for the soul, sure, and can be¬†perfectly healthy¬†a few times¬†a week, but home-cooked meals have the potential to be¬†so much better for the body. Plus, you pick exactly what ingredients go in (Don’t like mushrooms? You’ll never have to pick around one), how much goes on your plate, and you¬†don’t have to wait on somebody else to put your order in with the chef.

People like to say they “can’t cook.” Well, don’t take my word for it, but…

“Anyone can cook, but only the fearless can be great” –¬†Chef Gusteau (Ratatouille)

You can do it. To make it good, you¬†just need practice, and maybe a little help¬†from somebody whose¬†cooking you like.¬†And if you don’t enjoy being in the kitchen, I’ve got some¬†tips that might help you out with that.

  1. Pick out things at the store that make you excited to cook.¬†I love anything breakfast-y,¬†anything with the word almond in it¬†(almond butter, almond milk…), fresh fruit, dark greens, and whole grains. Oh yeah, and sweet potatoes. When you’re the chef, you’re in charge – why not make a meal out of your favorite healthy foods?

    bfast dinner 2.0
    Sweet Potato, Kale, & Egg  Skillet + Kodiak cakes + Almond butter + Berries + Almond Milk
  2. Make some noise in the kitchen. Listen to your favorite music, turn on the TV, call a friend, or recruit others to hang out with you¬†while you cook. You don’t have to isolate yourself! The kitchen should be one of the warmest and liveliest¬†places¬†in the house. Just don’t let yourself get distracted¬†while you’re pulling a pan out of the oven!
  3. Cook ahead. I love already having the tough part of a meal done, especially during the week. If I cook 2 decently large chicken breasts one night, I can¬†work that into 3 or 4 meals and¬†only have to cook the veggies and rice. If it’s been a¬†long day, I’ll just throw that chicken on a tray with corn tortilla chips and a little cheese,¬†chop up an avocado or a tomato, and call it nachos. Or, if it’s been a really long day… salad takes 2 minutes. It’s always there for me.

So yeah, cooking can be really fun. Therapeutic, even. At the very least, you can definitely do it! Never let fear of failure or imperfection get in your way. With cooking, diet, exercise, sport, school, a new job, or anything else in life РGo for it, and you might surprise yourself!

Good luck ūüėė

Rae

Me